Friday, July 11, 2008

Using phone position for traffic prediction

This is not a new idea, but IntelliOne now has a product called TrafficAid that translates cell phone signals into real-time traffic maps.

http://www.intellione.com/

 

Confidentiality and privacy

When people are given strong assurances that their information will be kept
private, are they more forthcoming? The results of one study suggest the
opposite: when confidentially is mentioned, people are less likely to
provide information. Can't vouch for the quality of the study they mention,
but the article and comments afterwards are thought provoking and relevant
to the concept of a NESP nonetheless.

Our Paradoxical Attitudes Toward Privacy
http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/07/02/our-paradoxical-attitudes-towards-p
rivacy/

On a related front, a judge recently ordered Google to turn over records on
who watched what videos on YouTube. This type of action, regardless of what
sort of assurances users of a NESP are given by the entity running it, could
lead people to fear participation in a program.

Google Told to Turn Over User Data of YouTube
July 4, 2008
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/04/technology/04youtube.html?_r=1&partner=rss
nyt&pagewanted=print&oref=slogin

Monday, July 7, 2008

Is the government watching with phones?

Is the Government Tracking Us Through Our Cellphones? Lawsuit Seeks Answers.
http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/07/01/is-the-government-tracking-us-throu
gh-our-cellphones-lawsuit-seeks-answers/

The types of concerns raised in the article (mentioning an ACLU fact-finding
lawsuit) and in the comments of those reading the blog clearly could impact
how a NESP is perceived.