= projects =
I've made a variety of web-based projects, mostly for classes I've taken. Even though the classes are over and everything's graded, I'd still like to hear any comments you might have about the projects.

I took a class called Interactive and Non-Linear Narrative, and I had a few stories to write for that class. The first project I made was a story about The Prom. My idea was to set up one story and let a reader switch between narrators, admittedly not too unique, but I wanted to make sure that each narrator told one cohesive story and that there wasn't the feeling of having one "true" story. It intentionally lags in the beginning to dissuade people from trying to read every single page in the story, but I think that strategy backfired.

My final project for Interactive Narrative is about my weekend in Providence, detailing a Spring Break event gone horribly wrong. I started out trying to tell a story by linking different expository styles and different artifacts; I'm not quite sure I had enough varied types, but I like the way it turned out.

Our campus newspaper used to publish a comic called "Jim's Journal", a strip that details the details of a rather bland life. A group I was in for a class decided that we could randomly reassemble the panels and wind up with equally reasonable comics, and I forget exactly how this got pawned off as meeting the requirements of our assignment. I wrote the language parser and got the page in its present form. The project was picked as a "site of the week" by two different on-line magazines, and we got the nod of approval from the author of the strip himself.

I did a project on The Boston Molasses Flood, a simple little game aimed at third- and fourth-graders. The goal was to dispatch policemen and cleaning crews to take care of the spreading molasses before innocent North End citizen drowned. Unfortunately, the server used for the class projects was given a new life devoid of web-page serving, and the files were erased without warning. Three different groups linked to the project, and now it's gone forever. Alas.

Working with a staff of graphic artists and big corporate payroll, during summers when I don't have other problem sets to finish up, I've had a hand in some other web sites.

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tivol@mit.edu